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Interdisciplinary Studies Course Descriptions


This course will introduce the student to the nature of an academic discipline and will explore the integration of faith and learning in selected interdisciplinary studies. Research methods and theoretical approaches used in current interdisciplinary studies will be examined as a prolegomena to the IDS 492 Senior Integration Project. Three hour. ‘W’

This course is designed to help students understand the cultural ideas that shape their lives and influence their actions. Attention is focused on the music, people, and events that have played a major role in American culture since 1950. Time will also be spent critiquing popular media like movies, music, news, and MTV. The goal is to give students the necessary tools for living a life of full-orbed obedience to Jesus Christ. As society moves into the twenty-first century, today’s college students will assume leadership positions in families, churches, government, and careers. This course is designed to help prepare students to serve effectively by understanding the spirits of the age and how they seek students’ allegiance. Three hours. ‘S’

A biblical, theological, and historical survey of the church’s response to social problems. Specific emphasis will be given to assessing the nature and extent of the church’s responsibility for addressing the varied dimensions of poverty. The course will include a strongly practical dimension where students, as members of Christ’s body, will identify specific approaches to personal application. Three hours.

This course offers opportunities for study in various topics of an interdisciplinary nature. These may be short-term courses offered during the semester or during the summer term. Topics will be decided by the faculty member as the need and interest arise.

The main purpose of this course is to understand the Utilitarian and Victorian worldviews which dominated 19th century England. Using Darwin’s autobiography and his diary, the student will have to reconstruct the Utilitarian worldview of Darwin when he departed on a circumglobal voyage on the Beagle. Once the student understands the utilitarian worldview, then the student is responsible to understand how it fits into the natural religion and political theory in Victorian England. Three hours. This course is also offered as an elective in the History Department (HIS 336) and for the philosophy and religion major. Three hours.

By the mid-19th century in Germany, there arose a sharp distinction between the methodology of the natural sciences and the human sciences. The human sciences maintained that they could not take their cue from the natural sciences which searched for general laws to explain phenomena. Rather, the human sciences wished to grasp the individual and unique features of sociocultural and historical phenomena. However, by what method does one come to interpret human action? Notable German scholars presented the method of inner human understanding (Verstehen). Hence, the purpose of this course will be to unfold the method of inner human understanding in the context of theology, language, history, philology, human sciences, phenomenology, existentialism, and anthropology. Three hours. This course is also offered as an elective for the philosophy and religion major and an interdisciplinary studies sociology concentration. Three hours.

The course acquaints students with the need for worldview thinking, with four worldviews of particular influence in the late twentieth and the twenty-first centuries (Marxism/Leninism, Secular humanism, New Age or Cosmic Humanism, and biblical Christianity) and with the worldviews’ implications for each of ten academic fields: theology, philosophy, ethics, biology, psychology, sociology, law, politics, economics, and history. Following the textbook, the course allows proponents of the competing views to describe and defend them; students are encouraged to think critically for themselves about evidences and arguments for and against the views. Important goals include developing critical thinking abilities, increasing understanding of competing worldviews and their implications, and heightened ability to explain and defend the Christian worldview and its implications. Three hours.

Modernity is a complex intellectual historical issue among scholars. The student will attempt to understand some of the traits of modernity by examining major historiographical interpretations of the European Enlightenment as a social, political, religious, philosophical, and intellectual movement. This course is also offered as an elective in the History Department (four units; HIS 335) and for the philosophy and religion major. Three hours.

This course is a detailed examination of the teachings, life, and times of Aurelius Augustine of Hippo. Particular attention will be given to Augustine’s Confessions, and its potential for interdisciplinary interpretation(s). Three hours.

This course is an upper level interdisciplinary research course dealing with the topic of athletics, sports and religion in the Greco- Roman world of the New Testament and early Christianity. The Hellenistic gymnasium, and its attending institutions will serve as the focal point of class research and discussion. Greco- Roman games, sports and athletic practices posed a significant challenge to the religious commitments and traditions of observant Jews and early Christians who often refused to participate in such pagan activities. Students will learn about the athletics in the Greo-Roman world and compare this background with some of the controversies and problems of sports and athletics both in the ancient world and today. Prerequisites: IDS 204, BIB 277 and COR 225. Three hours.

The course will use an interdisciplinary approach to exploring the relationship between religion, sexuality and love in the ancient world, especially the world of the Bible. Thus, theology, biblical studies, literary analysis, archeological studies, art (special lecturer), history, and psychology (special lecturer) will be the primary disciplines used to explore this curricular topic. More specifically, the course will unfold both the human and divine conceptions of love, beauty, pleasure, sacred practices and the sexual ethics of men and women in biblical times. The subtopics of gener, rites of passage, love, courtship, marriage, divorce; adultery, human sexuality and especially, homosexuality will be the focus of reading and discussionrs. Prerequisities: IDS 204, BIB 277, COR 225 and junior standing. Three hours.

The course will present an intellectual-historical analysis of the background, setting, and evolution of Rhetoric from the Greeks to the modern era in European culture. Rhetoric will be critically appraised in the context of philosophy, grammar (the use of language), logic (dialectic), education, culture, politics (political oratory), history, and ecclesiology. Three hours. ‘S’

African-American History from the Civil War to the present is a multi-disciplinary study surveying the African-American experience and emphasizing historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and psychological issues in the study of African Americans since 1865. Three hours.

African-American History from the Civil War to the present is a multi-disciplinary study surveying the African-American experience and emphasizing historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and psychological issues in the study of African Americans since 1865. Three hours.

This course will study the liberating effects of the Enlightenment upon the Netherlands during the 19th century and how the Dutch Calvinists attempted to reestablish the Christian foundation and heritage of Dutch and European culture. These neo-Calvinists (Van Prinsterer, Kuyper, and Bavinck) wished that every aspect of the encyclopedia must be reformed, transformed, and restored for Jesus Christ (e.g. politics, arts, sciences, civil law). They created an all-encompassing Reformed worldview in which the Lordship of Christ is sovereign over every sphere of life. Three hours.

See catalog page 32 for requirements.

This course offers opportunities for study in various topics of interest within the field of interdisciplinary studies. These may be short-term courses offered during the semester or during the summer term. Topics will be decided upon by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department faculty as need and interest arise. Credit to be determined.

See Organizational Management program.

This is a senior seminar focused on interdisciplinary research and writing. All requirements and deadlines for the completion of an interdisciplinary senior project/paper are reviewed in this course. Students are expected to present their projects/papers and sustain an oral examination at the end of the course. Two hours.

 

Fall 2014 Departmental Course Offerings
(click column title to sort)
Subject Course# Course Titlesort icon Days Begin End Instructor
IDS 201 Introduction to IDS TR 1430 1545 Dennison, Bill
IDS 492 Senior Integration Paper TR 0830 0920 Trimiew, Oliver
IDS 205 The Church and Social Concern TR 0930 1045 Trimiew, Oliver